Monday, October 24, 2016

Sailing





3 comments:

  1. Sweet blog Brad. Just found out about and glanced over it. Thank you making this information public. Kudos for perseverance.
    Do you have an estimate of how many man hours it took to build it?
    I'm seriously thinking of building a new Mana 24 when it comes out. I know it's a bigger boat but JWD plans to sell it as "a precise kit of CNC cut plywood parts, epoxy and glass cloth" which should save a considerable amount of time. I just have no idea if it's 10% or 50%.. Probably something in the middle. Any thoughts?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey man. Beto took me around a year and a half of work stretched out to around three years total time. I stopped counting hours shortly into the build, but I believe you could build the Mana 24 in a year or so for sure and probably less depending on how your skills are working on the weekends.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi,
    I’ve been following your blog and Beto looks great. I built my own T21 – Impulse – but it got a bit banged up in a massive Typhoon here in Hong Kong. All my beams got snapped like matchsticks. I was surprised, given that two of them had two layers of 18mm marine ply in the backbone web, and the aft beam had three layers.

    There was one piece of good news. Although my beams snapped, the lashings held up. I used 4mm spectra line on the outside lashings and ordinary 4mm synthetic line on the inboard ones to allow a bit of flex. Neither of them slipped at all. So, if anyone ever asks you how safe it is tying your boat together, you can tell them, that the lashings are the LAST thing to worry about when the weather gets heavy!

    Anyway, my hulls survived well, but I lost one of the side decks. I wonder if I could ask you for some photos of your slatted bridge deck? I’m thinking about building one myself. Any pictures of your construction, and how you have it fitted and supported, would be most useful.

    ReplyDelete